Exhibition

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁: 语嘿

A video screen showing a female-presenting figure in a red dress standing knee-deep in the ocean grasping a bamboo pole in both of her hands. The screen is suspended in front of some stained glass windows, with several bamboo poles standing upright on each side of the windows.

When

19 January -
24 March 2019

Location

4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art

181-187 Hay St, Haymarket

Curatorial Assistant: Kelly Doley

View the roomsheet here

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿 is the first retrospective of leading contemporary Chinese artist Xiao Lu. The exhibition is anchored by Xiao Lu’s performance work Dialogue from the landmark China/Avant-Garde exhibition at the National Art Gallery, Beijing, in February 1989. This work, in which the artist fires a gun at her own art installation, is a milestone in the development of contemporary art in China. It has also has been read as a critical turning point in China’s recent history. While Dialogue remains an iconic work of that era, it is also one of the most misunderstood pieces of contemporary Chinese art. Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue 肖鲁:语嘿  examines Xiao Lu’s creative interest in deep emotion, extreme action, and chance. Spanning a period of 30 years, the exhibition presents significant performance works by Xiao Lu including a new commission that explores the artist’s ongoing connection to Australia.

Xiao Lu: Impossible Dialogue is produced and presented by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art. This exhibition and associated programming are supported by the Australian Government through the Australia-China Council of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship project led by Dr Claire Roberts Reconfiguring the World: China. Art. Agency. 1900s to Now (FT140100743), and the Faculty of Arts, School of Culture and Communication, The University of Melbourne.

肖鲁:语嘿 是中国当代著名艺术家肖鲁的首次回顾展。展览从肖鲁1989年2月在北京中国美术馆内举办的,具有里程碑意义的中国现代艺术展上的装置行为作品《对话》——艺术家对着自己的装置开枪开始。这件作品在中国当代艺术发展中具有重要意义,被普遍认为是中国现代历史转折的文化信号,但它也成为当代中国艺术中最容易被误解的作品之一。 “肖鲁:语嘿”展示了艺术家对深层情感、极端行动和不同语境的创造发挥,同时也显示艺术家作品的鲜明特质。展览的作品跨越肖鲁30年艺术发展过程,包括一个全新的与悉尼相关的作品。通过这次回顾展,让观众探讨艺术家与澳大利亚的持续关系。

“肖鲁:语嘿”由4A当代亚洲艺术中心制作和展出。本次展览及相关教育项目得到了澳大利亚政府,澳中理事会的支持、以及罗清奇博士主持的澳大利亚研究理事会(ARC)前程研究项目《重设世界:中国、艺术与动力 1900年至今》(FT140100743)和墨尔本大学文化与传播学院艺术系的支持。

Artists

Two glass display cabinets in a white gallery space, with a photographic print of a woman in black with a ponytail, shooting a pistol. On the left wall is a projection and a collection of black inkjet prints
A video screen showing a group of blurred gallery visitors in movement
A white gallery space with two glass display cabinets, a projector stacked on concrete blocks facing a wall and a selection of black inkjet photographs pasted up on the wall
Yellowed newspaper clippings and photo prints in a glass display cabinet, one of the clippings titled 'Artist in hiding but work goes on show'
A framed photo of an East Asian woman in a long black sleeveless dress with long black hair, standing with her right hand on a metal sperm storage unit. Behind the photo is a white gallery space with sand and bamboo poles stood upright against a wall
Fifteen framed black and white prints depicting an East Asian woman with long black hair, torso up, standing against a brick wall and pointing a pistol at the camera
Five prints depicting the face of a huge block of ice, with a woman in a long, shapeless blue dress cutting into it from the other side. Part of the ice block is stained red with blood and running to the floor
A corner of a white gallery space, with part of the wall painted blue, showing two large colour prints of a figure in a white dress tipping a bucket of black paint over her head and her body. A video screen next to the prints shows a video recording of a woman in a white dress pouring a bucket of black paint over her head. On the left wall are several bamboo poles stood upright
A video screen showing a female-presenting figure in a red dress standing knee-deep in the ocean grasping a bamboo pole in both of her hands. The screen is suspended in front of some stained glass windows, with several bamboo poles standing upright on each side of the windows.
  

Events

Top image: Xiao Lu, Tides (弄潮), 18 January 2019, Sydney, sand and, bamboo, inkjet print on silk; photograph by Jacquie Manning, commissioned by 4A Centre for Contemporary Asian Art; photo: Kai Wasikowski, courtesy the artist.

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